Pope Benedict XVI: June 2012 Archives

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Today, If Ye Shall Hear His Voice

In listening to Our Holy Father deliver his message to the participants in the 50th International Eucharistic Congress, which closed yesterday in Dublin, two passages of Sacred Scripture immediately came to mind: "Today if you shall hear his voice, harden not your hearts" (Psalm 94:8);
and "He that hath ears to hear, let him hear " (Mark 4:9).

The Holy Father's message was unambiguous and to the point. He addressed four crucial issues facing the Church in Ireland:

1. The Liturgical Crisis
2. The Call to Holiness
3. Sin
4. Routine and Renewal

Bishops and Parish Priests would do well to address systematically each of these four issues in the weeks ahead, lest the good seed of the Holy Father's message fall on rocky ground or among weeds and briars.

1. The Liturgical Crisis

Until the liturgical crisis in Ireland (and elsewhere) is addressed, and concrete steps taken to remedy it, nothing of any lasting value will be accomplished at any level in the life of the Church.

The underlying principle is simple: Lex orandi>Lex credendi>Lex vivendi.

A people that worship rightly, that is:
• "as worthily and reverently as possible" (Pope Benedict XVI);
• in organic continuity with the received tradition of their historic rite;
• in fidelity to the letter of the rubrics and to their spirit;

will believe rightly, that is:
• in communion of mind and heart with the Church's living Tradition in all times and places;
• with a faith that both "seeks understanding" (Saint Anselm) and adores the Mystery;
• and in obedience to the Pope, the Successor of Peter, and to the bishops in communion with him;

and will act rightly and justly, that is;
in moral and ethical harmony with natural law and with Divine Revelation;
fructifying the theological virtues, the moral virtues, and the gifts of the Holy Spirit;
and building up a civilization of love, illumined by the splendour of truth.

2. The Call to Holiness

It is time to cast off, once and for all, the minimalistic and legal moralism by which the "practicing Catholic" has been identified for too long by too many. It is not enough to practice a lifeless and sullen adhesion to the outward forms of the Catholic identity. It is time for every bishop, priest, religious, layman, laywoman, and child to look in the mirror and say, "Today, relying on the grace of Jesus Christ, I resolve to become a saint".

A new Ireland, a Holy Ireland, a people of saints, can emerge today from the obscurity, confusion, and unrest of the past five decades, just as a Holy Ireland, a people of saints emerged from the obscurity, confusion, and unrest of paganism when Saint Patrick enkindled on this island the light of the Gospel and the fire of the Sacraments.

3. Sin

Sin must be unmasked and denounced for what it is: the single greatest obstacle to man's unhappiness in this world and in the next. Sin, in all its tentacular forms, has never made anyone happy. Vice foments misery; it brings in its wake emotional, psychological, and physical fragmentation. Virtue fosters happiness; it brings in its wake the inner healing that is the full meaning of salvation.

The remedy for sin lies in:
• identifying it, first of all, in oneself;
• in detesting it;
• in repenting of it;
• in resolving to turn from it;
• in confessing it as often as necessary in the Sacrament of Penance.

As long as bishops, priests, religious, and lay Catholics of all ages
• turn a blind eye to sin;
• make excuses for it;
• grow comfortable in it;
• delay turning away from it;
• and neglect frequent confession,
priestly life, religious life, and family life will continue to disintegrate,
Catholic culture will become increasingly invisible and inarticulate,
and, as a result, society itself will continue to rot.

4. Routine and Renewal

The "business as usual" approach to Catholic life, based on a sterile and lifeless compliance with minimalistic interpretations and applications of liturgical principles, doctrine, and morality, is nothing more than an attempt to inject a decaying corpse with embalming fluid. A naive satisfaction with things going according routine is -- with the occasional showy splash of bureaucratically engineered vitality (itself, part of the routine) -- is the indication that, beneath the surface, there is something very wrong.

Renewal must not be equated with novelty. Nothing gets older more quickly than novelty. What is needed is Pope Benedict's famous "hermeneutic of continuity". True renewal will rise out of a hard pruning of Church life in all its facets, beginning with the celebration of the Sacred Liturgy. Thus will the Church, the vine chosen and planted by the Father, begin to experience revitalization in Christ, a new vitality carried by the Holy Spirit into every branch and tendril.

The Holy Father's Text

I didn't intend to offer such a developed introduction to the Holy Father's message, but it is written, and I shall leave it as it flowed almost willy-nilly from my mind and heart. What is essential is the Holy Father's message in our points. He that hath ears to hear, let him hear.

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Dear Brothers and Sisters,

With great affection in the Lord, I greet all of you who have gathered in Dublin for the
Fiftieth International Eucharistic Congress, especially Cardinal Brady, Archbishop Martin, the clergy, religious and faithful of Ireland, and all of you who have come from afar to support the Irish Church with your presence and prayers.

Koinonia--Communio

The theme of the Congress - Communion with Christ and with One Another - leads us to
reflect upon the Church as a mystery of fellowship with the Lord and with all the members of his body. From the earliest times the notion of koinonia or communio has been at the core of the Church's understanding of herself, her relationship to Christ her founder, and the sacraments she celebrates, above all the Eucharist. Through our Baptism, we are incorporated into Christ's death, reborn into the great family of the brothers and sisters of Jesus Christ; through Confirmation we receive the seal of the Holy Spirit; and by our sharing in the Eucharist, we come into communion with Christ and each other visibly here on earth. We also receive the pledge of eternal life to come.

The Year of Faith

The Congress also occurs at a time when the Church throughout the world is preparing to
celebrate the Year of Faith to mark the fiftieth anniversary of the start of the Second Vatican Council, an event which launched the most extensive renewal of the Roman Rite ever known.

The Roman Rite: Misunderstandings and Irregularities

Based upon a deepening appreciation of the sources of the liturgy, the Council promoted the full and active participation of the faithful in the Eucharistic sacrifice. At our distance today from the Council Fathers' expressed desires regarding liturgical renewal, and in the light of the universal Church's experience in the intervening period, it is clear that a great deal has been achieved; but it is equally clear that there have been many misunderstandings and irregularities.

The Work of Real Liturgical Renewal

The renewal of external forms, desired by the Council Fathers, was intended to make it easier to enter into the inner depth of the mystery. Its true purpose was to lead people to a personal encounter with the Lord, present in the Eucharist, and thus with the living God, so that through this contact with Christ's love, the love of his brothers and sisters for one another might also grow. Yet not infrequently, the revision of liturgical forms has remained at an external level, and "active participation" has been confused with external activity. Hence much still remains to be done on the path of real liturgical renewal. In a changed world, increasingly fixated on material things, we must learn to recognize anew the mysterious presence of the Risen Lord, which alone can give breadth and depth to our life.

Call to Holiness

The Eucharist is the worship of the whole Church, but it also requires the full engagement of each individual Christian in the Church's mission; it contains a call to be the holy people of God, but also one to individual holiness; it is to be celebrated with great joy and simplicity, but also as worthily and reverently as possible; it invites us to repent of our sins, but also to forgive our brothers and sisters; it binds us together in the Spirit, but it also commands us in the same Spirit to bring the good news of salvation to others.

Ireland Shaped by the Mass

Moreover, the Eucharist is the memorial of Christ's sacrifice on the Cross, his Body and
Blood given in the new and eternal covenant for the forgiveness of sins and the transformation of the world. Ireland has been shaped by the Mass at the deepest level for centuries, and by its power and grace generations of monks, martyrs and missionaries have heroically lived the faith at home and spread the Good News of God's love and forgiveness well beyond your shores.

A Mighty Force for Good in the World

You are the heirs to a Church that has been a mighty force for good in the world, and which has given a profound and enduring love of Christ and his blessed Mother to many, many others. Your forebears in the Church in Ireland knew how to strive for holiness and constancy in their personal lives, how to preach the joy that comes from the Gospel, how to promote the importance of belonging to the universal Church in communion with the See of Peter, and how to pass on a love of the faith and Christian virtue to other generations.

Placed on the Lord's Altar

Our Catholic faith, imbued with a radical sense of God's presence, caught up in the beauty of his creation all around us, and purified through personal penance and awareness of God's forgiveness, is a legacy that is surely perfected and nourished when regularly placed on the Lord's altar at the sacrifice of the Mass.

Sin

Thankfulness and joy at such a great history of faith and love have recently been shaken in an appalling way by the revelation of sins committed by priests and consecrated persons against people entrusted to their care. Instead of showing them the path towards Christ, towards God, instead of bearing witness to his goodness, they abused people and undermined the credibility of the Church's message. How are we to explain the fact that people who regularly received the Lord's Body and confessed their sins in the Sacrament of Penance have offended in this way?

Merely a Matter of Habit

It remains a mystery. Yet evidently, their Christianity was no longer nourished by joyful encounter with Jesus Christ: it had become merely a matter of habit. The work of the Council was really meant to overcome this form of Christianity and to rediscover the faith as a deep personal friendship with the goodness of Jesus Christ. The Eucharistic Congress has a similar aim. Here we wish to encounter the Risen Lord. We ask him to touch us deeply. May he who breathed on the Apostles at Easter, communicating his Spirit to them, likewise bestow upon us his breath, the power of the Holy Spirit, and so help us to become true witnesses to his love, witnesses to the truth. His truth is love. Christ's love is truth.

The Next International Eucharistic Congress

My dear brothers and sisters, I pray that the Congress will be for each of you a spiritually
fruitful experience of communion with Christ and his Church. At the same time, I would like
to invite you to join me in praying for God's blessing upon the next International Eucharistic
Congress, which will take place in 2016 in the city of Cebu!

To the people of the Philippines I send warm greetings and an assurance of my closeness in prayer during the period of preparation for this great ecclesial gathering. I am confident that it will bring lasting spiritual renewal not only to them but to all the participants from across the globe.

In the meantime, I commend everyone taking part in the present Congress to the loving protection of Mary, Mother of God, and to Saint Patrick, the great patron of Ireland; and, as a token of joy and peace in the Lord, I willingly impart my Apostolic Blessing.

His Holiness, Pope Benedict XVI
17 June 2012

Corpus Domini 2012

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Here, in English translation, is the Holy Father's homily at the Mass of Corpus Domini last evening in Rome.

Dear Brothers and Sisters!

Il culto dell'Eucaristia e la sua sacralità

This evening I would like to meditate with you on two interconnected aspects of the Eucharistic Mystery: the worship of the Eucharist and its sacredness. It is important to take it up again to preserve it from incomplete visions of the Mystery itself, such as those which were proposed in the recent past.

The "Beating Heart" of the City

First of all, a reflection on the value of Eucharistic worship, in particular adoration of the Most Blessed Sacrament. It is the experience that we will also live after the Mass, before the procession, during its development and at its end. A unilateral interpretation of Vatican Council II has penalized this dimension, restricting the Eucharist in practice to the celebratory moment. In fact, it was very important to recognize the centrality of the celebration, in which the Lord convokes his people, gathers them around the twofold table of the Word and the Bread of life, nourishes them and unites them to Himself in the offering of the Sacrifice. This assessment of the liturgical assembly, in which the Lord works and realizes his mystery of communion, remains of course valid, but it must be placed in the right balance. In fact - as often happens - the stressing of one aspect ends up by sacrificing another. In this case, the accentuation placed on the celebration of the Eucharist has been to the detriment of adoration, as act of faith and prayer addressed to the Lord Jesus, really present in the Sacrament of the altar. This imbalance has also had repercussions on the spiritual life of the faithful. In fact, concentrating the whole relationship with the Eucharistic Jesus only at the moment of Holy Mass risks removing his presence from the rest of time and the existential space. And thus, perceived less is the sense of the constant presence of Jesus in our midst and with us, a concrete, close presence among our homes, as "beating Heart" of the city, of the country, of the territory with its various expressions and activities. The Sacrament of the Charity of Christ must permeate the whole of daily life.

Jesus Stays With Us

In reality, it is a mistake to oppose celebration and adoration, as if they were in competition with one another. It is precisely the contrary: the worship of the Most Blessed Sacrament is as the spiritual "environment" in which the community can celebrate the Eucharist well and in truth. Only if it is preceded, accompanied and followed by this interior attitude of faith and adoration, can the liturgical action express its full meaning and value. The encounter with Jesus in the Holy Mass is truly and fully acted when the community is able to recognize that, in the Sacrament, He dwells in his house, waits for us, invites us to his table, then, after the assembly is dismissed, stays with us, with his discreet and silent presence, and accompanies us with his intercession, continuing to gather our spiritual sacrifices and offering them to the Father.

To Look at Him with Love

In this connection, I am pleased to stress the experience we will also live together this evening. At the moment of adoration, we are all on the same plane, kneeling before the Sacrament of Love. The common and ministerial priesthoods are united in Eucharistic worship. It is a very beautiful and significant experience, which we have experienced several times in Saint Peter's Basilica, and also in the unforgettable vigils with young people - I recall, for example, those of Cologne, London, Zagreb, Madrid. It is evident to all that these moments of Eucharistic vigil prepare the celebration of the Holy Mass, prepare hearts for the encounter, so that it is more fruitful. To be all together in prolonged silence before the Lord present in his Sacrament, is one of the most genuine experiences of our being Church, which is accompanied in a complementary way with the celebration of the Eucharist, listening to the Word of God, singing, approaching together the table of the Bread of life. Communion and contemplation cannot be separated, they go together. To really communicate with another person I must know him, I must be able to be in silence close to him, to hear him and to look at him with love. True love and true friendship always live of the reciprocity of looks, of intense, eloquent silences full of respect and veneration, so that the encounter is lived profoundly, in a personal not a superficial way. And, unfortunately, if this dimension is lacking, even sacramental communion itself can become, on our part, a superficial gesture. Instead, in true communion, prepared by the colloquy of prayer and of life, we can say to the Lord words of confidence as those that resounded a short while ago in the Responsorial Psalm: "O Lord, I am thy servant; I am thy servant, the son of thy handmaid. / Thou hast loosed my bonds./ I will offer to thee the sacrifice of thanksgiving /and call on the name of the Lord" (Psalm 115:16-17).

Christ Did Not Abolish the Sacred

Now I would like to pass briefly to the second aspect: the sacredness of the Eucharist. Also here we heard in the recent past of a certain misunderstanding of the authentic message of Sacred Scripture. The Christian novelty in regard to worship was influenced by a certain secularist mentality of the 60s and 70s of the past century. It is true, and it remains always valid, that the center of worship is now no longer in the rites and ancient sacrifices, but in Christ himself, in his person, in his life, in his paschal mystery. And yet, from this fundamental novelty it must not be concluded that the sacred no longer exists, but that it has found its fulfillment in Jesus Christ, incarnate divine Love. The Letter to the Hebrews, which we heard this evening in the Second Reading, speaks to us precisely of the novelty of the priesthood of Christ, "high priest of the good things that have come" (Hebrews 9:11), but it does not say that the priesthood is finished. Christ "is the mediator of a new covenant" (Hebrews 9:15), established in his blood, which purifies our "conscience from dead works" (Hebrews 9:14). He did not abolish the sacred, but brought it to fulfillment, inaugurating a new worship, which is, yes, fully spiritual but which however, so long as we are journeying in time, makes use again of signs and rites, of which there will be no need only at the end, in the heavenly Jerusalem, where there will no longer be a temple (cf. Revelation 21:22). Thanks to Christ, the sacred is more true, more intense and, as happens with the Commandments, also more exacting! Ritual observance is not enough, but what is required is the purification of the heart and the involvement of life.

The Center of Our Life and the Heart of the World

I am also pleased to stress that the sacred has an educational function, and its disappearance inevitably impoverishes the culture, in particular, the formation of the new generations. If, for example, in the name of a secularized faith, no longer in need of sacred signs, this citizens' processions of the Corpus Domini were abolished, the spiritual profile of Rome would be "leveled," and our personal and community conscience would be weakened. Or let us think of a mother or a father that, in the name of a de-sacralized faith, deprived their children of all religious rituals: in reality they would end up by leaving a free field to so many surrogates present in the consumer society, to other rites and other signs, which could more easily become idols. God, our Father, has not acted thus with humanity: he has sent his Son into the world not to abolish, but to give fulfillment also to the sacred. At the height of this mission, in the Last Supper, Jesus instituted the Sacrament of his Body and his Blood, the Memorial of his Paschal Sacrifice. By so doing, he put himself in the place of the ancient sacrifices, but he did so within a rite, which he commanded the Apostles to perpetuate, as the supreme sign of the true sacred, which is Himself. With this faith, dear brothers and sisters, we celebrate today and every day the Eucharistic Mystery and we adore it as the center of our life and heart of the world. Amen.

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The Holy Father is continuing his series of catecheses on prayer during the weekly Wedneday audience. Last Wednesday, 30 May, the Holy Father gave the following address. The substitles in boldface are my own. How I wish that these catecheses on prayer were better known, read, and meditated!

Dear brothers and sisters,

The God of All Comfort

In these catecheses we are pondering prayer in the letters of St. Paul, and we are seeking to see Christian prayer as a true and personal encounter with God the Father, in Christ, through the Holy Spirit. In today's meeting, God's faithful "yes" enters into dialogue with believers' trustful "amen". I wish to emphasize this dynamic by considering the Second Letter to the Corinthians. St. Paul sends this impassioned letter to a Church that has repeatedly questioned his apostleship, and he opens his heart so that his hearers might be reassured of his fidelity to Christ and to the Gospel. This Second Letter to the Corinthians begins with one of the loftiest prayers of blessing contained in the New Testament. It reads: "Blessed be the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, the Father of mercies and God of all comfort, who comforts us in all our affliction, so that we may be able to comfort those who are in any affliction, with the comfort with which we ourselves are comforted by God" (2 Corinthians 1:3-4).

Consolation and Comfort from God

Paul suffered great tribulation and had to pass through many difficulties and afflictions, but he never yielded to discouragement, for he was sustained by grace and by the nearness of the Lord Jesus Christ, for whom he had become an apostle by surrendering his entire life to Him. For this reason, Paul begins this Letter with a prayer of blessing and thanksgiving to God -- for there was never a moment in his life as an apostle of Christ that he felt the support of the merciful Father, of the God of all consolation, lessen. He suffered terribly -- he says it in this Letter -- but amidst all these situations, when a path forward didn't seem to open, he received consolation and comfort from God.

Interiorly Free, Even in Suffering

He also suffered persecutions to the point of being imprisoned for the sake of proclaiming Christ, but he always felt interiorly free, animated by the presence of Christ, and filled with desire to announce the Gospel's word of hope. Thus, from prison he writes to Timothy, his faithful coworker. In chains he writes: "The Word of God is not fettered. Therefore I endure everything for the sake of the elect, that they also may obtain salvation in Christ Jesus with its eternal glory" (2 Timothy 2:9b-10). In his suffering for Christ, he experiences the consolation of God. He writes: "For as we share abundantly in Christ's sufferings, so through Christ we share abundantly in comfort too" (2 Corinthians 1:5).

Live Every Situation in Union with Christ

In the prayer of blessing that introduces the Second Letter to the Corinthians, what prevails in addition to the theme of affliction is the theme of consolation, which should not be understood as simple comfort, but rather as encouragement and exhortation not to let oneself be conquered by tribulation and difficulties. The invitation is to live every situation in union with Christ, who takes all of the world's suffering and sin upon Himself in order to bring light, hope and redemption. And in this way, Jesus makes us capable of consoling those who are afflicted in any way. Profound union with Christ through prayer and faith in His presence leads to a readiness to share in the sufferings and afflictions of others. St. Paul writes: "Who is weak, and I am not weak? Who is scandalized and I do not tremble?" (2 Corinthians 11:29). This 'sharing in' does not originate in benevolence, in human generosity or in a spirit of altruism; rather, it flows from the consolation of the Lord, from the unshakeable support of the "transcendent power that comes from God and not from us" (2 Corinthians 4:7).

In Difficulties, Misunderstandings, and Suffering

Dear brothers and sisters, our lives and our journey are often marked by difficulty, by misunderstandings, by suffering. We all know this to be true. In being faithful to our relationship with the Lord through constant, daily prayer we too are able to feel concretely the consolation that comes from God. And this strengthens our faith, because it makes us experience concretely God's "yes" to man, to us, to me, in Christ; it makes us feel the fidelity of His love, which extends even to the gift of His Son on the Cross. St. Paul affirms: "The Son of God, Jesus Christ, whom we preached among you, Silvanus and Timothy and I, was not "yes" and "no"; but in Him it is always "yes". For all the promises of God find their "yes" in Him. That is why we utter the "amen" through Him, to the glory of God" (2 Corinthians 1:19-20). God's "yes" is not halfway; it does not vacillate between "yes" and "no"; rather, it is a simple and sure "yes". And we respond to this "yes" with our "yes", with our "amen" and it is in this way that we remain secure in God's "yes".

Faith Is A Gift of God

Faith is not primarily a human action; rather, it is a gratuitous gift of God rooted in His fidelity, in His "yes", which makes us understand how to live our lives by loving Him and our brothers and sisters. The whole of salvation history is a progressive self-revelation of the God's faithfulness despite our infidelity and our rejection, in the certainty that "the gifts and the call of God are irrevocable!" as the Apostle declares in the Letter to the Romans (11:29).

God Never Tires of Us

Dear brothers and sisters, God's way of acting - which is very different from our own - gives us consolation, strength and hope, because God does not take back His "yes". In the face of conflict in human relationships, even with members of our families, we are inclined not to persevere in gratuitous love, which requires commitment and sacrifice. God, on the other hand, never tires of us; He never tires of being patient with us, and with His immense mercy He always goes before us; He goes out to meet us first; His "yes" is entirely worthy of our trust. In the event of the Cross, He offers us the measure of His love, which neither calculates nor measures. In the Letter to Titus, St. Paul writes: "The goodness of God our Savior and His love for men has appeared" (Titus 3:4). And in order that that this "yes" might be renewed each day, "He has anointed us and has sealed us and given the pledge of the Spirit in our hearts" (2 Corinthians 1:21b-22).

Sought and Summoned by Faithful Love

It is the Holy Spirit, in fact, who makes God's "yes" in Jesus Christ continually present and alive and it is He who creates in our hearts the desire to follow Him, in order to one day enter fully into His love, when in heaven we will receive a dwelling place not fashioned by human hands. There is no person who is not sought and summoned by this faithful love, a love that is capable of waiting even for those who continually respond with the "no" of rejection or with hardness of heart. God waits for us; He always seeks us out; He wills to receive us into communion with Himself in order to give each one of us fullness of life, of hope and of peace.

Amen

The Church's "amen," which resounds in every liturgical action, is grafted onto God's faithful "yes": "amen" is the response of faith that always concludes our personal and communal prayer, and that expresses our "yes" to God's initiative. In prayer, we often respond with our "amen" through habit, without grasping its profound meaning. This term comes from 'aman, which in Hebrew and Aramaic means "to make stable" to "strengthen" and, consequently, "to be certain", "to tell the truth".

Adherence to God

If we look to Sacred Scripture, we see that this "amen" is pronounced at the end of the Psalms of blessing and of praise, as in Psalm 41, for example: "You have upheld me by reason of my integrity: and have established me in Your sight forever. Blessed be the Lord the God of Israel from eternity to eternity. Amen. Amen." (Verses 13-14). Or it expresses adherence to God, at the time when the People of Israel return full of joy from Babylonian exile and pronounce their "yes", their "amen" to God and to His Law. In the Book of Nehemiah, it is said that, after this return, "Ezra opened the book in the sight of all people, for he was above all the people; and when he opened it all the people stood. And Ezra blessed the Lord, the great God; and all the people answered: 'Amen, amen," lifting up their hands (Nehemiah 8:5-6).

In the Apocalypse

From the beginning, therefore, the "amen" of the Jewish liturgy became the "amen" of the first Christian communities. And the book on the Christian liturgy par excellence is the Apocalypse of St. John, which begins with the Church's "amen": "To Him who loves us and who freed us from our sins by His blood, who made us a kingdom, priests for His God and Father, to Him be glory and dominion for ever and ever. Amen" (Apocalypse 1:5b-6). So it is in the first chapter of the Apocalypse. And the same Book concludes with the invocation: "Amen. Come, Lord Jesus" (Apocalypse 22:21).

Prayer: An Encounter with a Living Person

Dear friends, prayer is an encounter with a living Person to whom we should listen and with whom we should converse; it is an encounter with God who renews His unshakeable faithfulness, His "yes" to man, and to each one of us, in order to give us His consolation in the midst of storms and to make us live a life united with Him, full of joy and goodness, that will find its fulfillment in life eternal.

Christ Saying "Yes" to the Father in Us

In our prayer we are called to say "yes" to God and to respond with the "amen" of adherence, of faithfulness to Him with our whole life. We can never attain to this fidelity by our own powers; it is not only the fruit of our daily commitment; it comes from God and is founded on the "yes" of Christ, who says: "my food is to do the will of the Father (cf. John 4:34). We must enter into this "yes", [we must] enter into this "yes" of Christ, in adherence to the will of God, in order that we might say with St. Paul that it is no longer we who live, but Christ himself who lives in us. Then the "amen" of our personal and communal prayer will envelop and transform the whole of our lives, into a life of consolation, a life immersed in eternal and unshakeable Love. Thank you.

About Dom Mark

Dom Mark Daniel Kirby is Conventual Prior of Silverstream Priory in Stamullen, County Meath, Ireland. The ecclesial mandate of his Benedictine community is the adoration of the Most Holy Sacrament of the Altar in a spirit of reparation, and in intercession for the sanctification of priests.

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